Yesterday I found this wonderful poem while researching for my second book in the Ghost Series.  It is palindrome – which is a word, phrase or sequence that can be read the same either way (i.e. bats/stab or Dennis and Edna sinned).

Because a doppelganger (German for “double-walker”) is usually a ghostly image one sees of oneself in the mirror or walking around imitating the original human, I found this poem to be surprisingly poignant.  It’s basically a mirror image, if you folded the poem in half between the lines “night after night” and “night after night” the sentences repeat but the meanings change…just like witnessing ones own doppelganger and impending demise.  Enjoy!

Doppelganger

by James A. Lindon (Dmitri Borgmann’s Beyond Language – 1967).

Entering the lonely house with my wife
I saw him for the first time
Peering furtively from behind a bush —
Blackness that moved,
A shape amid the shadows,
A momentary glimpse of gleaming eyes
Revealed in the ragged moon.
A closer look (he seemed to turn) might have
Put him to flight forever —
I dared not
(For reasons that I failed to understand),
Though I knew I should act at once.

I puzzled over it, hiding alone,
Watching the woman as she neared the gate.
He came, and I saw him crouching
Night after night.
Night after night
He came, and I saw him crouching,
Watching the woman as she neared the gate.

I puzzled over it, hiding alone —
Though I knew I should act at once,
For reasons that I failed to understand
I dared not
Put him to flight forever.

A closer look (he seemed to turn) might have
Revealed in the ragged moon.
A momentary glimpse of gleaming eyes
A shape amid the shadows,
Blackness that moved.

Peering furtively from behind a bush,
I saw him for the first time,
Entering the lonely house with my wife.

Advertisements